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Thread: LPRT questions (those 40 watt Canadian AM relay stations for remote areas).

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Kentucky near Cincinnati
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    Default LPRT questions (those 40 watt Canadian AM relay stations for remote areas).

    What is the farthest anyone received a 40 watt LPRT?

    Would anyone have a picture of what the LPRT looked like? I heard years ago that these were installed on telephone poles near CN railroad stations to serve remote areas of Canada. What kind of antenna did they use? How big (size wise) was the transmitter?

    I found some information on this online from the DX Listening Digest 7-127 October 22 2007. Basically it started in Vancouver in 1940 in in Revelstoke on 840 KHz with 20 watts. I was curious if anyone has more information, photos and technical aspects of it all...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by KY-Near-Cincinnati View Post
    What is the farthest anyone received a 40 watt LPRT?

    Would anyone have a picture of what the LPRT looked like? I heard years ago that these were installed on telephone poles near CN railroad stations to serve remote areas of Canada. What kind of antenna did they use? How big (size wise) was the transmitter?

    I found some information on this online from the DX Listening Digest 7-127 October 22 2007. Basically it started in Vancouver in 1940 in in Revelstoke on 840 KHz with 20 watts. I was curious if anyone has more information, photos and technical aspects of it all...


    I note from the American Bandscan Blog (The work of our own W9WI - Doug Smith) that Chaine Française is converting CBON-6 from 1010 kHz AM to 98.5 FM.

    What's interesting about this is that CBON-6 is one of very few LPRTs I've actually heard (whilst passing through Blind River in 2005).

    If you do a street view for 100 Rue Nadon St in Blind River, and go down the street Southeast a little, you'll see, on the north side of the street, the big satellite dish and a shed, between two wooden poles, supporting what appears to be an inverted "L" antenna.

    Though the power of CBON-6 is 40 watts, the inefficient antenna gives an effective radiated power closer to 12 watts.

    No doubt WINS and CFRB give CBON-6 a lot of interference at night (though not as much as one would expect, they are not in either stations' major lobe). However interference from CFRB alone would put their 50% NIF to 5 mV/m (with the real NIF higher, since the standard for NIF is the worst 10% of the time).
    Comparing Sporadic-E skip to skip on the AM and shortwave bands is like comparing apples and oranges.

    Comparing tropo to skip is like comparing apples and bacon cheeseburgers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Kentucky near Cincinnati
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    Thanks

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