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Thread: OPMA is changing...

  1. #1651
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    All but one of the IFT-4 radio stations are now in the RPC, and the one missing was the only station to go to a fourth round - 88.3 at Chignahuapan, Puebla.

    For a full list of the 17 new FMs added today, with their callsigns and frequencies, look to my Twitter.
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    Into December we go and there are still new stations being awarded!

    -The Chiapas state network is moving to essentially transition two AM stations, at Ocosingo and Tecpatán. New FM concessions, for XHOCH-FM 103.3 and XHTECP-FM 95.1, have been awarded to the state network. These should serve as replacements for XEOCH 600 and XETEC 1140, respectively. The only AM transmitters remaining after this move will be at Palenque and San Cristóbal de las Casas. It is worth noting that the Villaflores service, a pirate on 98.3, still does not have a concession.

    -Seven social concessions were awarded for stations in Colima, Guerrero, Sonora and Zacatecas. It would appear these are untyped social stations.

    -Technical modifications for stations in Guanajuato, Guerrero, Jalisco, Sinaloa and Sonora.

    -Several radio and TV station concession transfers, in Culiacán and Torreón, as well as TV station XHTX.

    Further details should be available when the meeting agenda and minutes are posted.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  3. #1653
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    Second-wave migrants, especially those with talk formats, are faced with the choice of keeping their existing programming or blowing it all up and going to a musical format that might not have been viable on AM.

    The first such station to hit the air, XHCH-FM 89.3 Toluca, took the latter route, killing talk and going to music. While two of Puebla's (potentially) five migrants have already indicated they will retain their grupera formats on the FM band, XECD-AM does not appear to be going that route.

    While looking for info on XHEV-FM in Izúcar de Matamoros, which appears to have changed operators from Capital Media to locally based Grupo Oro, I instead found information on "La Romántica". Since I had heard reports that this is the new name for XHEV, I was instead surprised to see an "Under Construction" slide on laromantica.com.mx —*advertising not 99.9 but 92.9, which was the frequency reported back in July for XECD's migration. The Ciudad 1170 site has also disappeared as of sometime this week.

    Little else is known. We know the programming plans for

    XEPA (89.7) - retains Ke Buena
    XEEG (92.1*) - ???
    XECD (92.9) - flip to La Romántica
    XEZT (95.5*) - retains La Mejor
    XEZAR (96.1) - probably retains Arroba FM and likely flipped to this format in preparation for migration

    The two stations with asterisks may not migrate if they, as indicated, did not pay up to migrate. XEZT has promoted its FM frequency already and did so just days ago, so there is some uncertainty as to what's happening here.

    As to XHEV, the one note on its change, a line item in a Milenio Puebla column (which mentions not Grupo Oro but the Grajales family that runs it), put the station not in Izúcar but in Atlixco, about 35 km away. It may be that Grupo Oro has set up shop there instead of in Izúcar. The new station still has no social media or web presence, so finding further information is tricky.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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    Staying in Puebla but moving to another city, the Hermanos Serdán (unlicensed) community station in Tehuacán has a problem.

    They are complaining of jamming to their signal, causing listeners to not be able to tune in. The station is upset that they are being interfered with despite not being a commercial competitor and, according to them, being a totally lawful operation.

    Hermanos Serdán, according to Facebook, moved from 96.1 to 91.9 in July.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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    While digging through Cofetel-era documents, I saw something that must have come out of another universe. Well, not really. But it is a head scratcher, and I think it's worth addressing.

    Perhaps in another universe, 98.1 FM in Aguascalientes is celebrating ten years of broadcasting right now. No, I'm not talking about state-owned XHNM-FM, among the last of the migrants to come to air.

    I'm talking about XHUBT-FM, which would have been owned by Bona Terra, A.C. If neither of those sound familiar to you, well, they weren't to me!

    We start with the permit award that was made on May 2, 2007. XHUBT-FM was to be a class A station with facilities on the southern edge of the city, in an area also called Bona Terra. The application had been made two years earlier, on April 27, 2005.

    I believe XHUBT was to be a private university station, operated by the Universidad Panamericana, whose address matches that in the permit award. The representative was one Santiago Rodrigo Reinoso Velasteguí, who today is the Secretary General of the Universidad Panamericana Campus Bonaterra. This campus was started by this private, Catholic university in 2007.

    From there, it's unclear what happened, but XHUBT had to have crashed and burned fairly quickly. Perhaps the permit was never actually signed, or the university opted not to do anything. In any event, 98.1 was vacant and eventually awarded as the migration frequency for XENM-AM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  6. #1656
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    Tehuacán's frequency battle has prompted more attention from the local press.

    The report out of El Sol de Puebla goes into more depth on the Hermanos Serdán jamming issues. The operators of the station point the finger at Radiorama, operator of XHTCP-FM 90.7 and particularly XHTEU-FM 99.1, which they claim is jamming Hermanos Serdán with XHTEU's signal in order to try and recover lost listeners.

    Additionally, Radiorama apparently participated in a campaign to drive advertisers off of pirate radio stations. Hermanos Serdán says that they will attempt to attract the IFT's attention—a bold move for an unlicensed station—calling Radiorama's actions "sabotage and disloyal competition".

    Out of Municipios is another report that takes a wider angle. In the general region, there are 22 unlicensed radio stations. That figure is according to Francisco Sánchez [Tinoco], one of the owners of XHGY/XHWJ-FM (together known as RadioTH Comunicaciones) and a former head of the Puebla-Tlaxcala chapter of CIRT.

    Sánchez notes that the rise of community stations has eroded the outside advertising base of Tehuacán's local stations. Previously, potential advertisers in surrounding towns had to buy airtime from the Tehuacán stations. However, these unlicensed stations, which can and do operate as commercial ventures, have taken some of that market. Additionally, this piece notes that Hermanos Serdán has at times had to impose a 100 kHz offset and transmit at 92.0 MHz to attempt to escape the jamming.

    –––

    Speaking of community radio, the situation is apparently dire for Radio Teocelo XEYTM, the dean of social (and community) radio stations in Mexico. The station is still needing funds to update equipment, around 5 million pesos, and the rest of the article is something of a word salad about requirements to digitalize. (The real goal here might be a reserved band FM.)
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  7. #1657
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    Looking Back at the Class I Ghost Stations

    So I was curious to see, now that we have some final tallies from IFT-4, as to how the Class I ghost stations from 2000 might fare today. Here's a look by state:

    Baja California Sur

    2 stations each at Cabo San Lucas (99.9/100.7), La Paz (102.3/103.9)

    Bidders dropped out from these markets because of cost issues (Tecnoradio inflation) more than anything else. There might be *too* much supply, however BCS markets are in dire need of additional stations to reduce the market share of Promomedios California. It might be worth it to finally put these out to bid.

    Coahuila

    2 stations at Ramos Arizpe (96.7/101.7)

    This is the Saltillo market, and it would probably attract significant interest. If put in the PABF for noncommercial or other use, this could also let the Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro finally move to FM as it has desired for years, only to see the Article 90 reserved band steal an ideal frequency and internal strife prevent action.

    Guerrero

    106.1* at Teloloapan

    The municipality has 51,659 people but might not be that attractive of a radio market. There are no stations here. Additionally, the 106.1 frequency once proposed would have to be changed to accommodate the reserved band. (There are several allotments in here that would need to change.)

    Hidalgo

    94.1 at Tepeji del Río

    The problem with this allotment is that XHUAM-FM's upgrade to Class A would put an additional co-channel A at Tepeji short-spaced to the new Mexico City 94.1. If the SFN were still on the table, this would not be an issue. IFT-002-2016 prescribes a 100 km separation between co-channel Class A allotments. The distance from the UAM Cuajimalpa tower to Tepeji is 57 km, though a mountain is in the way.

    89.5 at Zacualtipán

    This would be the first radio service for this mountain town firmly in the Huasteca (and somewhat close to the Veracruz state line), 22 km from Huayacocotla. It has just 26,000 people. Zacualtipán is 70 km away from Tamazunchale, in San Luis Potosí; 60 km from Huejutla de Reyes; and in the opposite direction, 64 km from Pachuca and 70 km from Tulancingo. The viability of a station here might not be all that great.

    Jalisco

    2 stations at San Juan de los Lagos (91.9/106.3*)

    There was a station added here in IFT-4, which was XHPSJL-FM 96.1 bought by Arnoldo Rodríguez Zermeño — who has had quite the appetite for stations in the Jalisco highlands through social wolves and commercial acquisition.

    México

    2 stations at Valle de Bravo (105.3/106.7*)

    Valle de Bravo has just one commercial station — XHEVAB 93.5 (whose callsign protects the ghost at 106.7). The availability of alternate frequencies for the lost 106.7 isn't as much of an issue as it would be for...

    94.1 at Villa Guerrero

    Villa Guerrero sits on the south slopes of Nevado de Toluca...which means this station would either become the first FM for Ixtapan de la Sal (which has just one AM), the second station in the Tenancingo area (XHMLO-FM Malinalco has its studios in Tenancingo) or a move-in into Toluca (it does match Toluca's bandplan at 800 kHz). The frequency has a short-spacing problem to another recently added radio station — we're 48 km from XHFCSM-FM Cuernavaca using the assigned coordinates, or 41.16 km from the actual center of town.

    Michoacán

    105.5 at Los Reyes de Salgado

    There is a 92.5 here and a community 104.5 (which suggests that 105.3, not 105.5, might be the better frequency to put this station on).

    88.7 at Nueva Italia

    There was appetite for the two Nueva Italia FMs offered in IFT-4, so this is definitely an option.

    Oaxaca

    2 stations at Santa Lucía del Camino (104.9/106.5*)

    This is the Oaxaca area proper, which means that merely liberating 106.5 for a new community station would lead to a firestorm of applications. (The recently awarded XHEDI-FM is 400 kHz down the road at 106.1.) 104.9 is one of several glaring commercial or public allotments that could be made here. Oaxaca's bandplan suggests there are openings with full 800 kHz spacing on 88.1, 88.9, 90.5, 91.3, 92.1, 99.3, 103.7 and 104.9 (along with many obvious 400 kHz drop-ins). While I don't expect this to be the approach taken, putting 104.9 in IFT-8 would certainly attract interest.

    101.3 at Nochixtlán

    96.5 went in IFT-4. There aren't many stations here.

    Puebla

    92.1 at Zacatlán

    Two stations went in this area in IFT-4, including 91.7 Huauchinango and 88.3 Chignahuapan. There'd probably be decent interest.

    Querétaro

    101.9 at Tequisquiapan

    A local bidder took home XHPQUI-FM/Qro., marking this town's long-delayed entrance into the world of local radio. A second station (XHQUI-FM, coincidentally) would provide competition.

    Quintana Roo

    2 stations at Playa del Carmen (98.9/100.7)

    These would sell for a lot of pesos, just judging by the price that was paid for XHPPLY 96.1. XHDGM 98.9 was the subject of years of battles between an applicant and regulators (into the IFT era!).

    San Luis Potosí

    106.1* at Cerritos

    The last radio station here was XEWZ. It high-tailed it and moved into the capital city in the 90s. Aside from the need for a new frequency, this sounds like move-in bait eventually.

    106.1* at Salinas de Hidalgo

    There has never been a radio station for this town of 50,000.

    Sonora

    101.5 at Altar

    There are no commercial stations here, and no wonder — there are fewer than 10,000 in the municipality.

    91.3 at Etchojoa

    The only station here is a CDI AM operation, but with more than 60,000 residents, there's something here. Rimshotting Navojoa with a move to the northeast is also an option, especially if the station were built in town.

    Tabasco

    93.3 at Teapa

    This town is near the Chiapas line, close to Pichucalco. It has no stations.

    105.3 at Paraíso

    This town is due north of Comalcalco and on the coast. Comalcalco is, in turn, northwest of Villahermosa. A move-in might be what would happen here.

    Tlaxcala

    There would be more commercial stations on paper here than there are actual commercial stations (not including the Tlaxcala state-owned commercial stations) in the state!

    2 stations at Apizaco (93.3/97.3)

    Apizaco has XHXZ on 100.1 and that's it — even in a population of 80,000.

    2 stations at Tlaxcala (102.7/103.9)

    These stations would almost certainly be built to cover Puebla *and* Tlaxcala — and there certainly is room for more stations in both. It would be the first private commercial station to operate in the state capital of Tlaxcala, as XHXZ is in Apizaco and XHHT is in Huamantla. A well-placed, high-power station (which is to say probably not these) could cover Puebla, Tlaxcala, San Martín Texmelucan and Apizaco all together.

    Veracruz

    88.9 at Las Choapas

    102.3 at Naranjos

    Naranjos was up for grabs in IFT-4, but Tecnoradio's collapse meant neither of the two stations allotted met with qualified bidders.

    Yucatán

    104.7 at Ticul

    90.7 at Tekax

    Give the Tekax station to the municipal government that wants to build one — and did so on 90.5!

    Zacatecas

    88.7 at Sombrerete

    Both IFT-4 stations here found bidders, but they were primarily interested in statewide coverage, so additional bidders might be harder to grab.

    102.1 at Miguel Auza

    An AM covering this area was awarded in IFT-4. There has never been an FM in this municipality of 22,000.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  8. #1658
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    Akustik Media, S.A.P.I. de C.V. Escápate del Paraíso, S.A. de C.V. And now, Centrado Corporativo, S.A. de C.V.

    First reported by Gabriel Sosa Plata based on new shareholder information made available by the IFT last week, it's official: Centrado is the third leg of Grupo Acustik Media, which becomes the definitive winner of IFT-4 having nabbed 22 of the 141 stations that were made available.

    The information available also points us to the composition of other IFT-4 winners.

    Medios y Editorial de Sonora is owned by the successors of Julio Ramón Luebbert Duarte, who died in 2012, and Luis Felipe Romandia Cacho. We learn from this that this group runs the Expreso newspaper.

    Radio Casandoo, which won two stations in Oaxaca, is owned by Enrique Rojas Galindo and Luis Eduardo and Enrique Rojas Zavaleta. Rojas Zavaleta heads the state Secretariat of Agricultural, Fishing and Food Development (SEDAPA) and threatened a reporter just this July. He had previously been a municipal president and has other business interests.

    The El Sol Nochixteco, La Puerta de la Mixteca and Los Ojos del Cielo stations are all partly owned by members of the Vera Hernández family, discussed in Sosa Plata's piece. The family made its money in the leather tanning industry.

    Sonora Emedios is the business of the Lemmen Meyer family. They have to have some dual citizenship somewhere in there because they also own, through LM Media Group, KUDF-LP channel 14 in Tucson.

    ———

    It's time to get caught up on the new social stations that were awarded on November 28.

    Estéreo Peñasquito, A.C. — Mazapil, Zacatecas. There is a mine known as Peñasquito here. Did the mining company set up this station?
    Radio La Filosita, A.C. — Mezcala, Carrizalillo and Mazapa, Guerrero. Existing pirate on 99.1 in the community of Los Filos!
    Grupo Radio Fiesta Sierreña, A.C. — likely Moctezuma, Sonora
    Rate Cultural y Educativa de México, A.C. — Manzanillo, Colima

    Most noteworthy, several concession items were pulled from the agenda.

    The concession transfers were

    XHMP-FM -> Fermur Radio, S.A. de C.V.
    XHECQ-FM -> Radio CQ de Culiacán, S.A. de C.V.
    XHTX-TDT -> Telemisión, S.A. de C.V. (same concessionaire as co-owned XHAUC in Chihuahua)

    Technical modifications were the order of the day for XHANV-FM, XHKJ-FM, and four other stations, including three FMs and one AM.

    ———

    Victims of fraud took a radio station by storm last week in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca. XHTLX-FM "La Poderosa" was taken over because 12 percent of the station is allegedly owned by Rufino Sanjuán, who owns the SOFIC cooperative savings institution. SOFIC apparently disappeared and left account holders without their savings, leading to building takeovers in Santiago Juxtlahuaca and a street blockade in the state capital, among others, in the last year.
    Last edited by Raymie; 12-12-2017 at 05:58 PM.
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  9. #1659
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    Mmm, freshly printed in the Diario Oficial de la Federación... It's the 2018 PABF! Let's dig in!

    TDT

    Commercial: Just two commercial stations are included, a fairly low-power VHF station for Jojutla, Morelos, along with a UHF station for Villahermosa.

    Social: It's all-Vs, half of them in Michoacán. Notable large markets include Chihuahua, Cancún-Playa del Carmen, Chetumal, Villahermosa and Mérida.

    Public: The big prize here is tailor-made for one state government headed by Javier Corral. As had been reported here, Chihuahua wants a state network, and there's one in here, which would have a statewide concession on VHF and transmitters at Chihuahua Capital, Camargo, Cuauhtémoc, Delicias, Guachochi, Jiménez, Juárez, Nuevo Casas Grandes, Ojinaga and Parral. That's essentially the entire state. There's also another VHF, for Puebla.

    FM

    Commercial: A grand total of 25 stations, including B1s at Lázaro Cárdenas, Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo, Durango, Torreón and Parras de la Fuente — and a few in Baja California Sur. There's an A at Mazatlán. These stations will appear in the IFT-8 radio auction that's around the corner. The B1 at Torreón is a surprise — there doesn't seem to be room in that region.

    There's definitely space in Durango, though. There are no stations in Victoria de Durango below 92 MHz, XHITD is in transition limbo, while 93.7, 97.3, 99.7 and 102.1 are available. (104.5 has been earmarked for XHDRD to clear the reserved band, and XHOH will almost certainly be moved too.)

    Social: A platter of 21 social stations including allotments for Hermosillo, Villahermosa, Salina Cruz, Santiago Juxtlahuaca, Mérida, Fresnillo, and Manzanillo. All are A or AA except for a Class D station at Vicente Guerrero, Durango.

    Public: Yet another public FM for San Francisco de Campeche, plus stations at Xpujil, Taxco, Tlapa de Comonfort, Jesús María and Hermosillo. Just three stations appear for Chihuahua, suggesting a lack of available frequencies is going to frustrate plans for a public radio network there. The Nuevo Casas Grandes, Guachochi and Ojinaga allotments were made available, however.

    AM

    Commercial: Seven commercial AMs in some pretty small places. Why do people bother?

    Social: The presence of 49 social AM allotments is highly unusual, but most of that is due to some ambitious requests for 19 in Guanajuato, 21 in Michoacán, and 4 in Querétaro.

    Of course, now the clock begins for parties to make their own requests to go in the final 2018 PABF, which we should get around February. The publication of the first edition is somewhat later than usual, probably because the earthquake and approaching electoral year have the agency backed up.
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  10. #1660
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    From time to time I call out some of the worst headlines I've ever seen about broadcasting in Mexico.

    And I'd like to present this one on a silver platter.

    The dry wire service recaps of IFT meetings are already one level of confusion added. They are paraphrases of the press releases, which can be full of language that to someone not used to the IFT can just be a headache to understand. But when newspapers get a hold of them, they get even more confusing.

    El Heraldo de Coatzacoalcos seems to have thought it had found a local news story. A new radio station is certainly news!

    But a close reading of the meeting agenda does not support that reading. Here is the title of the agenda item in question:

    "Resolución mediante la cual el Pleno del Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones otorga un título de concesión para usar y aprovechar bandas de frecuencias del espectro radioeléctrico, así como un título de concesión única, ambos para uso público, a favor del Municipio de Coatzacoalcos, en el Estado de Veracruz de Ignacio de La Llave."

    OK, so they got a concession for some frequencies and the obligatory concesión única. But there are five words I do not see there. Here are some of the other agenda items that were plated the same day:

    "Resolución mediante la cual el Pleno del Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones otorga una concesión para usar y aprovechar bandas de frecuencias del espectro radioeléctrico para la prestación del servicio público de radiodifusión sonora en Frecuencia Modulada en Ocosingo, Chiapas, para uso público, a favor del Sistema Chiapaneco de Radio, Televisión y Cinematografía."

    "Resolución mediante la cual el Pleno del Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones prorroga la vigencia de dos concesiones para operar y explotar comercialmente una frecuencia de radiodifusión, para lo cual otorga respectivamente una concesión para usar, aprovechar y explotar bandas de frecuencias del espectro radioeléctrico para la prestación del servicio público de radiodifusión sonora en Frecuencia Modulada y, en su caso, una concesión única, ambas para uso comercial."

    "Resolución mediante la cual el Pleno del Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones otorga a favor de Estéreo Peñasquito, A.C. una concesión para usar y aprovechar bandas de frecuencias del espectro radioeléctrico para la prestación del servicio público de radiodifusión sonora en Frecuencia Modulada en Mazapil, Zacatecas, así como una concesión única, ambas para uso social."

    What do all three of these have in common that the Coatza item does not? This phrase:

    "radiodifusión sonora en Frecuencia Modulada"

    If the municipality of Coatzacoalcos was getting a radio station, that magic phrase would be in the agenda item.

    What we have here is probably an authorization for frequencies for private communications for the municipality, telemetry, or some other use like that. These sorts of authorizations do come from the Pleno and have been given to municipalities, federal agencies, and municipal water systems. They deal with spectrum use, but in more of a telecommunications sense than a broadcasting one.

    ———

    After that look into the recent past, we can look into 2018 and the excitement of another radio auction.

    Over the weekend, Nicolás Lucas of El Economista sat down with Alex Navarrete, head of the IFT's spectrum unit, to discuss what's coming next.

    IFT-8, the next radio auction, will likely start up in the second half of the year, including the commercial station allotments in the last three PABFs (2016, 2017 and 2018, including any new petitions for the 2018 PABF); stations that had winning bidders but were not claimed in IFT-4 (for nonpayment or other disqualification); and other IFT-4 stations if there is interest. It is worth noting that IFT-8 might have happened sooner if IFT-4 had not dragged on so long.

    There will also be another TV auction, apparently. Other matters discussed primarily concern new telecommunications auctions and a change for short-term use of frequencies for events that is of no interest here.
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