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Thread: OPMA is changing...

  1. #1671
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    I don't expect to see new station sign-ons the rest of the year, and it's the holidays, but I wanted to post this New York Times story because I think it will explain a lot about the way media behaves in Mexico. Official advertising run amok is the primary way that government subdues media outlets, and while the article spends a lot of time on newspapers, these same pressures apply to broadcast outlets as well.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  2. #1672
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    For the first time, we have a callsign for one of the new TV stations from IFT-6.

    XHJGM-TDT on channel 15 at Uruapan, Michoacán, is owned by José Guadalupe Manuel Trejo García, but the station will be operated by his son, Marco Trejo Pureco.

    That's not the only story in that article, though. You see, Corporativo Trejo is the Michoacán version of Grupo Akustik Media. They're sailing the airwaves without a concession in Morelia!

    I figured that article came from their own media entity, so I went to read the "About Us" page. In addition to a newscast aired on XHURM-FM 102.1, there was a mention of it airing on a 95.3.

    I didn't recognize the frequency — there are no licensed stations on 95.3 anywhere in Michoacán — so I turned to Facebook.

    And lo and behold, "Radio Pop Digital 95.3"!

    To confirm that this was the station of interest, the account had just shared a post reading "Gran posada Navideña del CORPORATIVO TREJO". Whoa!

    Pop Digital does not have its transmitter at its studios at Yunuen 52. According to their own biography, it launched in March 2016.

    The connection to XHURM is confusing. XHURM is a Radiorama station with the La Mexicana format.

    This makes two IFT auction winners this year that operate pirates on 95.3.
    Last edited by Raymie; 12-26-2017 at 11:27 AM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  3. #1673
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    This one's a bit historical, but I think it's worth sharing given that this station probably was a headache for whoever was in charge of making callsigns for second-wave migration...

    While there are 25 dual-callsign FM pairs, there is just one on AM, and it is deliberate.

    While XEWA had been operating in San Luis Potosí since 1948, the XEWA in Monterrey was not given the green light until May 1961. (The two stations were connected into the 21st century, though today they are very much separate but co-owned entities. Televisa Radio does not even directly operate the SLP station.)

    The callsign originally given to XEWA/Monterrey was XEWM-AM. This should raise some eyebrows — that callsign had to bounce around quite a bit!

    It was originally awarded in 1955 for what became XETAB (and is now XHTAB-FM) in Villahermosa. This callsign was in use there through at least 1959.

    By 1969, the XEWM calls had moved from Monterrey (if they were ever there long) to San Cristóbal de las Casas for the launch of what is today's XHWM-FM.

    Since XHEWA is already taken for the SLP station, this one should have an interesting callsign. XHWAM (or XHEWAM?) would make sense if the procedure for creating these was identical to Cofetel-era migration. Stations like XHNAQ (already an XHENA) and a few southeastern cases, like XHROOC, XHMET, XHFCY, XHCANQ and XHAC/Camp., got their new calls by adding a letter to represent the city or state. (Even though XHROO, XHEME, etc. were available, this was done a bunch in the southeast.)
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  4. #1674
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    Most of the 13 winners of IFT-6 had their identities known by now, but not one: Radio-Televisión Digital de Nayarit.

    With the publication of ownership information for IFT-6's winners, much like was done earlier for IFT-4, we now know that RTDN is co-owned by José Antonio Rodríguez Tello and Diego Nieto González. It is worth noting that the company had previously been referred to as Radio-Televisión de Nayarit.

    Rodríguez Tello has a history in communications in Nayarit. His site, NTV (formerly known as Nayarit en Línea), is a news portal and online TV channel. He also was once the director general of the Sistema de Radio y Televisión de Nayarit — the state network, not to be confused with the new TV company — and for a time in the late 2000s ran the Álica Medios stations in Tecuala and Puerto Vallarta. Additionally, he was the press secretary for Governor Antonio Echevarría Domínguez when he took office in 1999 and spent four years as an El Universal correspondent.

    Nieto González owns Nieto Constructora, S.A. de C.V., which competes for public sector construction contracts. The company, while founded and headquartered in Cuernavaca, seems to have taken an interest in Nayarit in recent years, with new contracts there.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  5. #1675
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    2017 was a year to be bombarded with news, and the world of Mexican broadcasting was certainly no exception.

    It was a year shaped by the two biggest station auctions in the country’s history, which marked a historic opening of commercial radio and television for the first time in more than two decades. However, the radio auction lost much of its luster due to anticompetitive activity by one bidder.

    That wasn’t all. In September alone, a succession crisis at the IFT and two earthquakes rocked the industry. New stations also began to hit the FM band by way of direct awards and the second—and likely last—wave of AM-FM migration. There were plenty of format changes, including some national-level ruptures, and some broadcasting milestones.

    Licitación

    The year’s dominating stories were IFT-4 and IFT-6, the historic radio and television auctions. IFT-4 only concluded late in November, while IFT-6 is nominally still going but is far more settled at this point than its radio sibling.

    The IFT-4 auction took place in February and ultimately adjudicated 114 FM and 27 AM stations. Of the 191 FM and 66 AM frequencies on offer, about a third met with absolutely no interest whatsoever. However, a malicious bidder was the primary story in the radio auction.

    Tecnoradio, S.A. de C.V., was a nobody that some people thought had ties to Grupo ACIR and that others linked to a former IMER head. But when Javier Tejado Dondé’s column broke the truth in May, the seeds were sown not only for their disqualification but for criminal and economic competition investigations. Tecnoradio, which won more than 30 stations, had astronomical bids and had driven the prices up in other lots of the auction. It turned out that the company was the unholy brainchild of Alí Eduardo Bañuelos, who had won federal auctions before to produce TV sets for the digital transition. His wife, Viviana “Vivis” Toscano, is from the Pérez Toscano family that runs Audiorama, one of the increasingly present familial divisions of Radiorama. RR could not compete in the auction directly as a consequence of another economic competition investigation.

    The very high bids also meant that some stations that should have gone to other parties were declined. Most notably, Grupo Radio Centro, competing as Promotora de Éxitos, backed out of two stations in Acapulco that ultimately went vacant and a frequency in Chetumal. GRC did win stations in Cancún — arguably the jewel in the crown — as well as at Campeche. Tourist destinations were among the most coveted frequencies in the auction, and Quintana Roo’s own Acustik Media, doing business as Escápate al Paraíso, picked up more than half of the new AM frequencies, with which it plans to build a national network.

    Most concessions were awarded in July, and ex-pirate XHPVAT-FM 88.3 Maravatío went into the record books for being on air just three days after getting its official paperwork. The next known sign-on did not occur until September, when the two stations in Guachochi, Chihuahua, signed on the air.

    IFT-6 went much more smoothly, but its controversy was over a winner that actually got something: Albavisión, the company of Ángel González, which won 12 stations trading as Telsusa Televisión México. Other big winners were Multimedios and Francisco Aguirre Gómez in Mexico City.

    Three other notable parties competed and won in both auctions. Grupo Zócalo nabbed a Monclova radio station, now on air, and a Saltillo TV station. The Tribuna papers obtained FM-TV clusters in La Paz, Los Cabos and Puerto Vallarta, while Radio Operadora Pegasso, revealed to be one of three winning radio bidders associated with the Torres Corzo family of San Luis Potosí and its GlobalMedia broadcasting business, won the San Luis VHF TV station and radio stations in surrounding states.

    Stations are now on air in a few areas from IFT-4. Many more should come on the air for 2018, along with IFT-6’s television stations, just in time for a hectic and unsettled electoral year.

    Who’s the President?

    Politics was also the reason for the IFT’s succession crisis, which broke out in September and was not resolved for weeks. The Senate refused to immediately reconfirm Gabriel Contreras as the head of the agency, and per the agency’s organic law, the oldest commissioner, Adriana Labardini, took the reins. It was not until early October, after a lengthy series of hearings with the commissioners vying for the role, that the Senate, in a vote marred by allegations of ballot box stuffing, returned Contreras to the top job.

    As an electoral year approaches, political pressures are only going to increase at Insurgentes Sur. Labardini’s term ends in February 2018, requiring a new commissioner to be confirmed to the post. That ball is already rolling. Additionally, a draft law that would stiffen penalties against pirate broadcasters, which is being decried by community radio and human rights activists, sits in the legislature and has the approval of broadcaster-aligned deputies (and probably senators).

    Second-Wave Migration

    In July, 41 stations in all got the green light to take FM frequencies that had not been available prior to the change of station spacing to 400 kHz. All but one were commercial broadcasters, with the notable exception being Radio Educación, soon to transmit on 96.5 to Mexico City. The stations include two in Mexico City, as well as outlets in Guadalajara, Puebla, and Monterrey, and in some border cities.

    The first second-wave migrant, XHCH-FM Toluca (89.3, formerly XECH-AM 1040), began testing in October and began program service November 6. XHCH and the other 40 stations (which could potentially be the other 38 in actuality, due to nonpayment by two potential migrants in Puebla) will be required to transmit in HD Radio as a condition of migration; along with the 50 stations in IFT-4 that committed to HD Radio in order to obtain a scoring bonus, the number and distribution of IBOC-enabled stations in Mexico should improve considerably in the coming months.

    In terms of formats, some second-wave stations, particularly talkers, are jettisoning their existing programming for music. Examples include (probably) XHECD-FM 92.9 Puebla, which will flip to La Romántica on migration, and XEOK in Monterrey, which is to shed its talk shows for Radio Disney.

    Community Radio

    There were many community radio assignments made in 2017, along with a handful of public and untyped social stations.

    In just three months, two stations were greenlit for the Juchitán, Oaxaca, area. Guna Caa Yuni Xhiña, A.C., received XHGCY-FM 106.1 “Órbita Digital”, while Yati Ne Casti, A.C. also jumped into the fray with a community station. That brings the total in the region to three. There were quite a few others, particularly in Oaxaca and Michoacán.

    The highest profile community station can thank second-wave migration for its existence. The same process that identified those available frequencies found 22 of them in the Article 90 reserved band, including 106.1 Mexico City. In August, Alianza por el Derecho Humano de las Mujeres a Comunicar, A.C., won the concession, and XHCDMX-FM “Violeta Radio” is slated to take to the airwaves early next year. It is the first community station for Mexico City proper and the first feminist community station in the country. Also in the Mexico City area but not in Mexico City itself, XHNEZ-FM 97.3 won an amparo to get a concession in Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, and XHCHAL-FM was given the go for 98.9 MHz as the first radio service in Chalco, a pair of municipalities with a population greater than 700,000.

    Format News

    The format story of 2017 came in the summer, when Grupo Audiorama cut all ties to Televisa Radio and changed formats at the majority of its stations as a result. Ke Buena and Los 40 were replaced, or shuffled around, with Audiorama’s own La Bestia Grupera and Súper brands in the same categories. This change likely occurred amid the backdrop of the realignment between the companies and Televisa Radio’s incursion into Ensenada, where Audiorama previously had a Los 40 station, in IFT-4. Format changes were noted from Chetumal to Tijuana.

    Audiorama was also the epicenter of effects to radio from the September 19 earthquake, centered near the Morelos-Puebla state line. The collapse of the ten-story Torre Latinoamericana in Cuernavaca, home to Audiorama’s Cuernavaca transmitter and studio facilities, knocked XHCM and XHNG off air for six days. In the same city, XHTIX was forced to broadcast from MVS Radio’s studios for a time and also spent several days off air.

    Another 2017 theme was the expansion of Grupo Larsa Comunicaciones outside Sonora. In addition to an HD3 and FM translator in Tucson, Arizona, they picked up the Radiorama (División Pergom) cluster in Mexicali and XHRAW-FM in Ciudad Miguel Alemán, Tamaulipas. In typical Larsa fashion, they wasted no time putting Toño on the air in those markets.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  6. #1676
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    Surely Mexico is the broadcast story of 2017. Awesome work capturing it! I am curious -is there anything along the lines of a master list of AM stations that have signed off and moved to FM?
    Saul Chernos
    Burnt River ON

  7. #1677
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul View Post
    Surely Mexico is the broadcast story of 2017. Awesome work capturing it! I am curious -is there anything along the lines of a master list of AM stations that have signed off and moved to FM?
    I have a list of AM stations that have continuity obligations — i.e. they must stay on AM. I don't have a list of stations that have left. What is this for?

    It is also worth noting that some AM frequencies are being brought back into use with the stations awarded in IFT-4.

    Additionally, this year two Combos of '94 closed their AM frequencies and went FM-only. These are XEZS Coatzacoalcos, which made deal of turning off its AM transmitter, and XEVU in Mazatlán, which was discovered to have surrendered its AM authorization in June. It is also believed that XECSV Coatza is gone for good but on the books, as XEZS's shutdown was described as the closure of the last AM in town.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  8. #1678
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    Realizing fairly recently that I did not know a couple of pretty powerful Mexico City stations had departed. I was presuming 0000/0600 anthems to be those stations when in fact they had gone silent, to FM, and I should have waited for whatever might have IDed. I'll often sweep the band at 0000 / 0600 central time looking for anthems...
    I think the stations were 790 and 1030. Wondering if there are others in my logbook that are now silent...
    Saul Chernos
    Burnt River ON

  9. #1679
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul View Post
    Realizing fairly recently that I did not know a couple of pretty powerful Mexico City stations had departed. I was presuming 0000/0600 anthems to be those stations when in fact they had gone silent, to FM, and I should have waited for whatever might have IDed. I'll often sweep the band at 0000 / 0600 central time looking for anthems...
    I think the stations were 790 and 1030. Wondering if there are others in my logbook that are now silent...
    The case of 790/1030/1150 in Mexico City is not migration.

    Grupo Radio Centro shut the stations down, presumably to save on operating costs, and consolidated the programming onto its other two AMs (690 and 1110). It has also been reported that the land under the sticks has been sold for development.

    The only commercial migrant to FM in Mexico City is 1560, which seeing as it has spent more time off than on in the last decade, serves to create a brand-new radio station. 1060 will also migrate but will do everything it can to get that frequency on a new concession.

    Honestly, I really should have put that in the year-ender...
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  10. #1680
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    Would that explain why Radio Red 1110 has been ultra strong this fall-winter? Heard more and better than usual?
    Saul Chernos
    Burnt River ON

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