Page 44 of 145 FirstFirst ... 3442434445465494144 ... LastLast
Results 431 to 440 of 1444

Thread: OPMA is changing...

  1. #431
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Raymie, I have not seen any CCI from an Azteca-7 relayer mixed with XHHSS-4 Hermosillo this year. I even saw K04QP with
    only CCI from XHHSS hendering decoding. That is very odd, as Azteca-7 relayer XHCAN-4 Cananea has always been there.

    I wonder if XHCAN is off or with greatly-reduced power.
    It should still be there, though this one guy has kept complaining to @rn_azteca that their Cananea signals are...not great. They have shadow XHFA-2 (100 watts) as well there.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  2. #432
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    3,563

    Default

    Thank you, Raymie.

    XHFA-2 Nogales is a tough catch for DXers. The last time I IDed XHFA was several years ago, and they were putting their text ID
    upper right.

    I wonder how well TV viewers ever received that 100 watt shadow in Cananea.
    Danny
    Shreveport, LA
    Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
    Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
    TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
    My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
    More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

  3. #433
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    The Importance of Being González

    In the early 1980s, in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila, Raúl R. González Lozano began operating a radio station. XHRG-FM 95.5. From this one station, the seeds of a media empire spanning both sides of the Río Grande, several generations of the González family, and broadcasting and cable, came to life.

    Soon, Grupo RCG would become a media empire in its home state. With Televisa local station XHRCG-TV channel 7 in Saltillo (bought in the late 1980s and rechristened in 1991), its satellite XHCAW-58 Ciudad Acuña, a pair of Saltillo FM radio stations and a string of northeast Mexican cable systems.

    But it is not the only media empire in the González family. In fact, there are two more of them, and the three interlock in utterly confusing ways. Now, they are being threatened by a very serious money laundering scandal involving the ex-governor of Coahuila.

    The Son: Roberto G. González

    R Communications is the lone business in this group to be based in the United States. Owned by Roberto G. González, the son of Roberto Casimiro González and one-time chief advisor to RCG, is one of the successors to BMP, Border Media Partners. Border Media Partners was a privately owned binational station group, with stations in San Antonio, Austin, Laredo and Nuevo Laredo, the Rio Grande Valley and Waco. When BMP was broken apart in 2009 as part of a forbearance agreement with its lenders, it was mostly split up. The Laredo LPTV went to Brian Brady’s Eagle Creek Broadcasting and was used as a license replacement for KVTV in that station’s sale to Gray Television earlier this year. The San Antonio and Austin stations went elsewhere. But in Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley, R Communications, owned by the González son, picked up the slack. It owns 13 radio stations, some of which are licensed to BMP concessionaires in Mexico, and it also programs the two Ciudad Acuña radio stations owned by Grupo RCG, including XHRG-FM.

    Its biggest move to date is perhaps its acquisition of KMBH channel 38 from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, which occurred in 2014. KMBH, which is comparable to Mexican stations like XEWH as a non-profit station with a commercial license, remains with PBS programming. R Communications has formed its own binational empire, based on the American side unlike RCG and NRT.

    The Brother: Rolando González Treviño

    The story of KVAW in Eagle Pass, Texas, is kind of long, confusing, and it’s only gotten moreso in recent months.

    This station, which is the only American station to serve Piedras Negras, came into the world in 1991 on analog channel 16. In 2000, a dispute between Juan Wheeler, Jr., the station owner, and HTVN, which wanted to buy the station, led to one of the strangest FCC applications. HTVN filled out both the buyer and the seller side of the application, and the Maverick County Sheriff signed in lieu of Wheeler, who was believed to have fled the US.

    HTVN soon crumbled, and Dr. Joseph Zavaletta picked up the station in 2003. It began running Más Música, which soon became MTV Tres. Zavaletta also managed to file a digital application, originally for channel 18 but eventually to move to channel 24 for post-transition operations.

    The good doctor, though, began seeing problems. Eagle Pass and Piedras Negras do not make a large station market, and Zavaletta saw more value in the station as a San Antonio rimshot. He filed with the FCC to move the station closer in. It became a tangled mess, not helped by economic issues, the need for Mexican coordination, and the station needing to go silent for financial reasons during the recession. As if that were not enough, Zavaletta was diagnosed with cancer, and he died at the age of 77 in January 2010.

    After almost having its license revoked, the FCC had a change of heart, reinstated the license, and allowed for the sale of the station from the doctor’s estate to NRT Communications Group. This is where things get even cloudier.

    If you have read this blog recently, you might have recalled a blurb about XHMAP-7 Monclova, Coahuila. This station, with an unusually lengthy history and many program sources over the years, had settled down airing NRT’s channel 4, a cable channel. NRT, which stands for Núcleo Radio y Television, is owned by Rolando González Treviño, who was a friend of the governor of Coahuila, Humberto Moreira. It was the second broadcast station to air cable channel 4, after the (probably unlicensed) XHRG-TV. (The callsign itself tells you the provenance of the station!) In addition to cable 4 Monclova, NRT also owned its own cable provider, EIINRT; cable channels 6 Saltillo and 10 Sabinas; KVAW, which now brands as channel 24; and XHEMF 96.3 and XEWGR 780/XHWGR 101.1 in Monclova, each carrying formats from MVS Radio.

    NRT, however, began hitting serious legal trouble last year. US prosecutors allege that members of a conspiracy wired $1.8 million to González’s bank accounts as payment from a Mexican company for the sale — money stolen from the state government of Coahuila. He has pleaded guilty to these charges. His sentencing is in September; he not only faces either five years probation or up to five years in prison, but also deportation. In November 2014, XHMAP dropped NRT.

    So now what?

    While RCG is likely to be the least affected operation, and NRT has taken a beating precisely because its owner is the center of controversy, R Communications is in an interesting situation. R Media Trust’s stations were transferred to R Communications Trust, whose sole beneficiary is Robert L. Reed, a resident of Scottsdale, Arizona and a manager of a company related to R Communications. Who knows what’s next.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  4. #434
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    The IFT is on a two-week break, so almost nothing is coming out. About the only news on the TV front is that Azteca Colima is finally turning on its Atenquique transmitters, starting with XHKF-TDT 43 (Azteca 13), and that one user has noted work on the XHAUC tower in Chihuahua.

    To celebrate my one-year anniversary of this outpost of information...more history, mostly radio this time.

    In Search of Serna: Two Lost TV Stations and the Discovery of Even-Frequency FMs in Mexico

    Recently I was doing a search for more information about Clemente Serna Martínez, whose media empire included such milestones as Radio Red, Radio Programas de México and XEDK-TV over the years. (The Serna family still actually owns XEDK, though Televisa pays them to run Gala TV on it.)

    One of the best sources on historical Mexican broadcast information is, as I have used countless times, the Diario Oficial de la Federación. Particularly for older material, the DOF has unrivaled information. Sometimes the RPC's concession copies just come from the DOF.

    So, when I searched Serna, I expected something between Serna Martínez and his son, Clemente Serna Alvear, but not this:

    * A concession for an AM station, XECT in Monterrey.
    * A concession for an AM station, XEBJ in Benito Juárez/Ciudad Victoria Tamps. This was confirmed as his signature is on the original concession in the RPC. The concessionaire name has not changed, but the station is now owned by ORT.
    * Several attempts to get FM radio stations in Tamaulipas.

    But there were two areas that caught my attention:

    Television

    In 1964, Serna received the concessions for two TV stations; he also had applied for a third. Look closely at the locations of the stations, the callsigns and the channel numbers; nothing will quite line up!

    * XHI-4(+) Chihuahua, Chih.
    * XHMZ-2(-) Mazatlán, Sin.
    * Channel 4, Torreón, Coah.

    XELN's concession history does not include anything with Serna Martínez. XHI and XHMZ all got their starts later (XHI in Obregón started operations in 1965). The XHIT concession history in the RPC, because it is an Azteca station, only goes back to the privatization of Imevisión, so the DOF is required. It appears that Impulsora de Televisión, S.A., sold the station. The concession key for XHIT was 68-X-7 (October 7, 1968). The callsign probably changed because of the Obregón station coming to air in 1965.

    As for XHMZ, its concession key is 67-XII-18 (December 18, 1967), and its ownership does not line up. There's not even a channel 2 in Mazatlán anymore.

    FM Radio

    And then there was this curiosity in the DOF from 1959: a concession for XEXM-FM on 106.0 MHz. You read that right, an even 106! Nothing fits the puzzle here, though it's worth noting:

    * There was an XEXM-AM in Mexico City, on 610 kHz, in 1941. The callsign was reassigned in 1975 to Jerez, Zac., on 1150 kHz.
    * A Billboard article on new stereo FMs in Mexico City from 1966 talks about XEOY-FM 100.9 (this was soon swapped with XEBS-FM 89.7) and XEXM-FM, no frequency given but listed as with Radio Programas de México.
    * The concessionaire in the DOF piece was listed as Cía Radiotelevisora Mexicana. The 1970 list shows this company as owning XHVIP-FM 104.9 (now XHEXA-FM). The callsign XHVIP makes a lot of sense, as RPM owned XEVIP-AM 1560 "Radio VIP", a news and beautiful music in English that later moved to XHRED-FM 88.1. (Some sources indicate 88.1 had the XHVIP calls, as it had the format. It never did.)

    Then I hit the Broadcasting Stations of the World 1963 book. And the even FM jackpot. And the graveyard of FMs that never happened. Among the more notable:

    Mexico City
    XERCN-FM 88.4 --> XHRED-FM 88.1
    XEX-FM 88.6 (double listed 88.6/101.7)
    XHM-FM 88.8 --> 88.9 (this explains the name of the modern concessionaire: Radio 88.8, S.A.)
    XHFO-FM 91.6 --> 92.1
    XELZ-FM 96.0 (co-existing with XEUN FM 96.1!?!?)
    XEXM-FM 106.0
    XEMY-FM 106.8

    There were also a boatload of unfamiliar calls:

    XENM-FM 90.3
    XHR-FM 90.9
    XEWY-FM 95.3

    And notably:

    XHFM 94.1 still listed (had left the air for good in 1957)
    XEN-FM 99.7 --> 99.3 (now XHPOP-FM)
    XERPM-FM 103.1 --> 103.3 (now XERFR-FM)

    Elsewhere
    XEBI-FM Ags 88.4 (ended up migrating as XHBI-FM 88.7!)
    XEF-FM Cd. Juárez 89.6
    XEIQ-FM Obregón 88.2 (same city also had listed 88.3)
    XEBJ-FM Cd. Vic. Tamps. 88.8 (migrated to FM as XHBJ-FM 107.1)
    XEBL-FM Culiacán 88.2 (FM combo as XHBL 91.9)
    XEZA-FM Cerro El Zamorano Qro. 92.2 (XEW repeater)
    XEKG-FM Fortín Ver. 88.6
    XEDL-FM Hermosillo 88.4 (migrated to FM as XHEDL 89.7)
    XEBH-FM Hermosillo 90.2 (now AM/FM combo XHEBH 98.5)
    XERS-FM Gómez Palacio 88.4
    XEAD-FM Guadalajara 88.2 (built on 101.9)
    XEJB-FM GDL 96.4 --> 96.3
    XEO-FM Matamoros 88.2
    XEGE-FM Mexicali 88.6
    XEH-FM Monterrey 93.2 --> XHQQ 93.3 (view original concession)
    XET-FM Monterrey 94.0 --> 94.1
    XEAX-FM Oaxaca 88.4
    XEMU-FM Piedras Negras 88.4 (migrated to FM as XHEMU-FM 103.7)
    XEPA-FM Puebla 88.2
    XEDN-FM Torreón 88.2 (how would this 88.2 co-exist with Gómez Palacio 88.4???)

    The question: What happened to all the even FMs? To all those vanished Mexico City FMs? The evens were gone by '70. Did Mexican regulators decide they needed to follow US spacing?

    EDIT: A look at the 1966 list shows not many changes. Many of the even FMs outside of Mexico City still look even. They had even added some:

    XESS-FM 88.8 Ensenada BC
    XEFX-FM 107.2 Guaymas Son.
    XEWV-FM 89.6 Mexicali
    XENV-FM 90.0 Monterrey
    XEBX-FM 88.2 Sabinas Coah.
    XEUX-FM 88.2 Tuxpan Nay.

    In Mexico City, XHM and XHFO had moved to their current dial positions.

    1969 shows a couple new ones too. At this point information lag could be to blame as well, given that clearly modern station spacing was forming in GDL and Mexico City:

    XHCM-FM 88.0 Cuernavaca (this is a mistake, listed as 89.0 in 1974. They split the difference and got 88.5.)
    XEGE-FM 88.6 had become XERM-FM

    XELZ had disappeared. XET had moved to 94.1, though XHQQ was still on 93.2 — it likely was the last FM of its kind in Mexico, as it is the only such FM in the 1970 DOF list.
    Last edited by Raymie; 07-26-2015 at 02:20 AM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  5. #435
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    3,563

    Default

    Interesting articles, Raymie.
    Danny
    Shreveport, LA
    Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
    Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
    TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
    My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
    More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

  6. #436
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Interesting articles, Raymie.
    This is how I fill time without any other stuff to talk about. The RPC debuted in March 2014, and it's made a lot of new types of research possible. The problem is that many of the RPC documents do not have optical character recognition so it is hard to run Google site searches — not even newer materials that were clearly made on modern computers.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  7. #437
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    XHQQ on 93.2 even appears in our distance records list, along with XHOX-95.4 Tampico. (Thought it was a misprint! It probably is, as nothing turns up for XHOX 95.4.)

    A couple notes:

    -Clerical: There's a missing Mexican callsign. X??? on 106.9 in Ensenada BC is XHADA.
    -The Jim Renfrew (2050 mi) and Russ Edmunds (2010 mi) receptions of XHRED are the longest ever of a Mexican on 88.1 and (according to the list) the longest reception of any 88.1 via Es since 1987.
    -Steve Walko's XHER 92.9 (2090 mi estimated) is the longest Es reception ever on 92.9. It even beats out Nick Langan's KAFF Flagstaff in 2012 (that was 2041 miles, it's not there).
    -Speaking of Nick, his catch of XHNY 95.1 Irapuato, Gto., 2056 miles, is the new recordholder for Es on 95.1.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  8. #438
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    3,563

    Default

    Raymie, I forgot to say that I never knew XEDK is not owned by Televisa. I've been seeing XEDK since the days they were on
    channel 6 (through my old local analog KTAL). I wonder if XHG-4 newscaster Becky Reynoso is the same Reynoso who did news
    on XEDK-5 when the station was independent.

    As for the distance records, those have to be reported to Fred by DXers; so it is no telling how many distance records, etc are
    not on those lists.

    In addition, sometimes DXers send in honest yet erroneous stats. I contacted a DXer up north who was (and may still be listed)
    as having a log from tougher-than-nails to receive and ID Colima. He said he actually had Chihuahua, which is quite a bit different
    distance-wise and ID-wise.

    Fred can only report what is reported to him.
    Danny
    Shreveport, LA
    Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
    Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
    TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
    My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
    More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

  9. #439
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Raymie, I forgot to say that I never knew XEDK is not owned by Televisa. I've been seeing XEDK since the days they were on
    channel 6 (through my old local analog KTAL). I wonder if XHG-4 newscaster Becky Reynoso is the same Reynoso who did news
    on XEDK-5 when the station was independent.

    As for the distance records, those have to be reported to Fred by DXers; so it is no telling how many distance records, etc are
    not on those lists.
    Thanks for explaining the records to me. I figured not everything was reported. But still, even comparing some of that June 23 opening to those stats is downright amazing.

    XEDK's ownership, the Serna family, were always kind of close to Televisa. Radio Programas de México, which I've talked about a bit, was formed by Serna and Emilio Azcárraga in 1941 as basically a syndication service for the programs of XEW and XEQ, not to mention their national advertising clients. (Serna bought Azcárraga out in 1961.)

    However, Azcárraga also recognized when Serna was too much of a competitor. In the early 90s Grupo Medcom, which at that time had formed an alliance with Joaquín Vargas Gómez (MVS), was the highest bidder for the 7 and 13 networks. This had Televisa scared. Apparently, on more than one occasion, Azcárraga said of Medcom in that context, "El que sea, menos el grupo de Serna y Vargas" ("Anybody but the Serna and Vargas group"). He got his wish.

    Televisa, though, does control all of XEDK's program time and provide all its employees under a contract that is not dissimilar to an LMA or JSA/SSA in the US. Corporación Tapatía de Televisión is considered part of Televisa for preponderant economic agent purposes, as are all local stations of Televisa and all of Televisa's concessionaires (Televimex, Radiotelevisora de México Norte, T.V. de Los Mochis, Canales de Televisión Populares and several others).
    Last edited by Raymie; 07-26-2015 at 08:46 PM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  10. #440
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,996

    Default

    To celebrate one year of this long epic, now reaching its 440th post, I am excited to present...

    The First Annual Mexxies: Raymie's Mexico Beat Awards
    For Outstanding Events in Broadcasting

    That's right, an awards show of the finest in Mexico-related (and beyond) broadcasting news from this crazy year. There are a good number categories, so let's get to it!

    Foolish Business Decision Award
    The Mexxie goes to... Grupo Radio Centro for making a MXN 3bn bid for the national networks when it needed a bank loan just to pay the security deposit! Since this spectacular failure, GRC has gone on to eat up half of its sister company, Grupo Radio México, and it saw its stock prices fall precipitously as a well.

    Most Endangered Species
    The Mexxie goes to... Sistema de Televisión y Radio de Campeche, for operating a TV station at 1% of licensed ERP, abandoning its permits to expand statewide, and seeing the permit on its AM station sunset. That said, TRC has made some efforts to stay relevant, applying for a new FM station and obtaining an authorization for digital television.

    Other nominee: Sistema Quintanarroense de Comunicación Social

    The Miguel Herrera Award for Most Disappointing Performance
    The Mexxie goes to... Haiti, for making its planned digital television transition a spectacular failure and basically canceling it altogether. While their decision to go on the GE06 date was incredibly ambitious, and their selection of a standard with two years to go even more so, it is still sort of surprising to see such a complete neglect to follow through on that legal commitment.

    John Brinkley Award for Technical Achievement
    The Mexxie goes to... Gray Television and Eagle Creek Broadcasting, for engineering a station sale and license type change in a dastardly creative manner and simultaneously freeing up a UHF television channel for repacking, all while causing zero disruption to Laredo viewers.

    Other nominee: Televisión Azteca and Televisa, jointly, for their rollout of hundreds of new digital television transmitters

    Biggest Gainers from the Digital Television Transition
    The Mexxie goes to... Zacatecas, Zacatecas. In analog, Zacatecas had five television stations, all of them commercial. With the digital transition and sign-on of Cadena Tres, Zacatecas will add at least four new stations, two of which were awarded just last month and all but one of which are noncommercial.

    Best Identification of an unID SS Radio Station
    The Mexxie goes to... Gargadon for taking Saul's four-year-old of Spanish who-knows-what and pulling out an ID from a Mérida radio station.

    Best Reception of an SS Television Station
    The Mexxie goes to... Rich McVicar of Navarino, New York, for his outstanding reception of an Azteca station on channel 2 not in Chihuahua, most likely XHAZL-2 Cerro Azul Ver., at nearly 2,000 miles.

    Best Moment on This Forum
    The Mexxie goes to... Sergio Marin of Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche, for joining these forums and setting up a meeting between two DXers in the same city who didn't know each other.
    Last edited by Raymie; 07-27-2015 at 03:43 PM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •