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  1. #711
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    Today is the final day for analog television in the Cinco Manantiales and Saltillo regions of Coahuila, in Guanajuato and Querétaro, as well as in two Sonora towns and one location in Baja California. It is the first of four slated apagones in two weeks.

    State networks gear up for apagón

    Digital viewers in Hidalgo, or at least in Pachuca, can now get the state network in digital. Authorizations were given earlier this year alongside a renewal of permits and change to public concessions. "Now on Canal 42 HD" is appearing in some of their advertising.

    In Tlaxcala, the situation is a little different. According to Revista Pantalla, TDT will be able to go to TDT on time. There are some problems. While they have HD-ready studios, mobile units and soon an HD master control, their satellite contract only provides 3.5 MHz of bandwidth, not a full 6. This means they cannot send an HD signal to their transmitters, which take the satellite feed as terrain makes a microwave system too complex. They will begin in SD.

    Engineer Hector Parker also mentioned that they'd ideally like to expand to 8 transmitters from the 5 they have, in order to cover the 10 percent of Tlaxcala that cannot receive the state network.

    A new radio station on the air testing in Yucatán

    Meanwhile, a potential tropo target in the Yucatán Peninsula has begun testing: XHYRE 107.9 Mérida with Radio Educación. It's a big moment for Radio Educación, as this is its first ever FM and its first ever station outside Mexico City. In the competition among public broadcasters, this is actually a pretty big deal.
    Last edited by Raymie; 12-10-2015 at 07:41 PM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  2. #712
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    Videos from tonight's apagón:

    XHLGG León, from Multimedios engineer Guillermo Franco. This was a Periscope of the live shutoff which occurs about 4:45 in: https://www.periscope.tv/w/1yoKMbypYopGQ

    XHRCG Saltillo, another Periscope: https://www.periscope.tv/w/1djGXbrLwBRxZ and a YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iMY...ature=youtu.be

    Also, a full rundown of the end in Saltillo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcpXeldQHKQ

    XHQUE Querétaro Azteca 7: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6qHVJJHESA

    XHOPCE Celaya: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0iWYlO-2KI

    XHL León went out at 12:05am: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3tji4ipktI
    Last edited by Raymie; 12-12-2015 at 12:00 AM.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  3. #713
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    There's one analog station left in Celaya: XHCEP-11.

    They have a digital authorization, and they've ordered a transmitter, but it still needs to be installed. Issues with transporting the transmitter have been the last missing link for them.

    Also, do they know what PSIP means over there? They could easily be 11.1, though I think they may hesitate to do so given their proximity to XHL León. I'd actually anticipate in that area that some viewers would receive two channel 11s. (46 is the correct RF.)

    Meanwhile, the apagón's complexity is leading to some particularly poorly written articles. UnoTV Puebla gives us one of those. No, every station is going off on 12/17 in Puebla (the city). If they mean the state, that is correct (as Tehuacán and Zacatlán have stations that aren't going off on the 17th). We also have a column from someone at SIPSE that doesn't take into account that XHST not only has a digital authorization and is on the air but also has a pretty high-powered station going.

    And the SCT says 8.8 of 9.7 million TVs have been delivered.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  4. #714
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    Where Do Mexican Radio Callsigns Come From?

    A new, also irregular feature, taking a look at specific stations this time.

    XHQRO-FM Celaya, Gto.

    Your eyes are not fooling you. There is a station with the XHQRO-FM callsign...and it's not in Querétaro or Quintana Roo. Well, sort of on that first one.

    This is intended. The station in question broadcasts from Cerro Culiacán, near Celaya. Anyone who has read my writings since I came on board knows more than they should about the geography of this region of the country (thanks to TV), so I'll skip that. You can probably see the intended outcome of this.

    XHQRO began life in 1986, as XHCGT-FM (now that's more of an expected callsign!). It is owned by Corporación Bajío Comunicaciones, formerly known as Corporación Celaya Radio. XHCGT was the first FM station in Celaya, known as El y Ella. The stations went through various affiliations — Corporación Mexicana de Radiodifusión, Multimundo (which later sold its own stations to Imagen) and Grupo ACIR.

    In 2011, CCR, seeking to return to Querétaro where it had partially operated XEQG-AM until that station's owner decided to sell to OEM, decided that it was going to move XHCGT to Querétaro without moving its transmitter. And so it happened; the station got a shiny new callsign, moved its studios to Querétaro, and now competes in that market with a pop format.

    XHTY-FM Tijuana, BC

    Mexican radio stations don't often change their callsigns, and they rarely conduct move-ins into bigger markets. But such is not so when Baja California enters the picture. I'd estimate that BC has the highest concentration of changed callsigns in the country, and it has a couple of move-ins (looking at you, XHBCE --> XHPRS).

    XHTY is a strange case. The original XHTY is now XHA-FM, thanks to a series of callsign changes conducted by XHTY's then-owners, Radio Cadena Nacional (which sold to Uniradio), in the 90s. XHBCN-FM had already changed its calls once, having originally been assigned the XHB-FM callsign. In 1997, the station, which then was known as Radio Amor, became XHAMR-FM. Two years later, XHTY became XHA, and XHAMR became XHTY — guess where the Radio Amor name went, to 94.5!
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  5. #715
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    On December 31, at least 99 stations serving 31 cities in 13 states will go off the air:

    http://www.ift.org.mx/comunicacion-y...nicado-1142015

    The main service areas are:

    AGUASCALIENTES: All main analog stations incl. shadow XHBD
    BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur: Cd. Constitución, San Isidro and San José del Cabo
    CHIHUAHUA: Hidalgo del Parral and Santa Bárbara
    GUERRERO: Iguala and Taxco de Alarcón
    HIDALGO: Tulancingo
    JALISCO: Puerto Vallarta
    EDOMEX: Ixtapan de la Sal; Tonatico; Zacazonapan
    NAYARIT: Acaponeta-Tecuala; Islas Marías
    QUINTANA ROO: Cozumel and Cancún
    SAN LUIS POTOSÍ: Tamazunchale; Cd. Valles
    SINALOA: Los Mochis; Culiacán; Mazatlán
    SONORA: Cd. Obregón; Guaymas; Nogales; 12 Telemax transmitters
    VERACRUZ: Coatzacoalcos

    The wording implies more stations will be authorized for this on 12/31.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

    Read the Mexico Beat | Download Mexican FM Station Coordinates v2 | View my HD Radio in Mexico map

  6. #716
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    A History of Television in Guadalajara

    Getting to Air

    Guadalajara is to Mexico City what Los Angeles is to New York. It is Mexico’s second city, a metropolitan area of more than 4.3 million. It is Mexico’s cultural heart, home to the annual FIL book fair and Chivas soccer.

    And in 1959, it finally got television, a whole decade after Mexico City and even several years after Monterrey.

    But to take a look at the history of television in Guadalajara, we actually need to step back a bit, as far back as 1952, when Televisora de Occidente, S.A., was formed by Emilio Azcárraga Vidaurreta. It was later rolled up into that great consortium-monopoly known as Telesistema Mexicano, but it did not bring a television station to air in the city until the end of the 1950s. Instead, from 1956, those lucky few who had a set aimed their antennas east in hopes of catching the signal from the then-new Cerro del Zamorano repeater station.

    As the 1950s ended, TSM began to seriously think about bringing television to Guadalajara. In 1958 it formed Televisora de Guadalajara, S.A., and began work on building Televicentro, a new facility to eventually house its television stations. Tests began on March 2, 1959, while the final concession for XEWO-TV channel 2 (the added O standing for Occidente, as in West) was awarded in January of the next year. On May 14, 1960, Televicentro had its formal grand opening. It boasted GE master control equipment, three DuMont cameras and a 5 kW transmitter. However, the 1960 general census showed that a mere 13,390 homes had TV sets in the whole state, most of those in the metro area.

    Bolstered by the recent formation of Televisoras de Provincia, S.A., a special TSM group devoted to helping bring television to the rest of Mexico, and later by the 1962 creation of the National Microwave System (SNM), the station linked up to programming from Mexico City and reaped the benefits of national advertising buying power and reach. In 1961, XHG-TV channel 4 began broadcasting from Televicentro, a powerful one-two punch.

    Enter Canal 6

    They weren’t the only ones. Televisión Tapatía set up one of Mexico’s few local and independent television stations, putting XEHL-6 on air on September 22, 1960. TT was backed by important local business owners. The stage was set for an unusual fight between broadcasters. In Mexico City, TSM reigned supreme, being the only commercial broadcaster and really the only broadcaster of note in the country (though the IPN’s fledgling Canal Once had started up in 1959, it was a complete non-factor and was also of a cultural and educational nature). TT had to go up against TSM’s programming and national reach (including infrastructure allowing it to retransmit Mexico City programs to Guadalajara and vice-versa via La Piedad, Mich.). In late 1960, XEWO broadcast 11 hours a day—XEHL, just five and a half. While both stations began offering programs at 11am from mid-1961, XEHL had more studio shows and XEWO the greater variety. When XHG came on the scene, TSM had the lead, with one of its stations (4) running XEW’s programming from Mexico City.

    Not only were channel 6’s ratings faltering, but national structural issues began to come to the fore. In 1962, Walter Cross Buchanan, engineer and Secretary of Communications and Transport, declared that there was an opportunity to bring television programs across Mexico, “from border to border and coast to coast”. It was TSM who quite clearly had the lead. Local advertisers were sticking to the reach and power of Televicentro and TSM. The SNM microwave system permitted TSM to bring its viewers the launch of Gordon Cooper into space and the funeral of John F. Kennedy, as well as to export stuff to the United States. The Spanish International Network, which for decades was the American arm of TSM/Televisa, brought viewers in San Antonio, Texas, the “Grito” from Mexico City in September 1963.

    As TSM embarked on its expansion projects, a new microwave link was added in 1963 on Cerro Gordo, near Tepatitlán, Jalisco, improving the quality of Guadalajara’s link to XEW-TV. At the end of that year, for improved convenience, XEWO became the repeater and XHG the local station. Meanwhile, the losses piled up for Televisión Tapatía. The problems were wider; not just were the advertisers staying away, but TSM was ripping off TT’s programs. The ship ran aground after more losses in 1964, and Televisión Tapatía signed a contract with TSM under which the latter would provide advertising services for channel 6. That helped boost their revenues by 73.7% for 1965. TSM also furnished videotape equipment to channel 6.

    New Rivals

    If you’re familiar with the history of Mexican television, or have read too much of my blog, you probably know all about TIM, Televisión Independiente de México, which grew from XET-6 Monterrey and built XHFM, XHP and XHTM-8 Mexico City on its way to becoming the first serious national challenger in TSM’s television empire; it was the channel 8 in Mexico City that became the namesake of “El Chavo del Ocho”. Televisión de Jalisco, S.A., was formed in 1965.

    Even though TSM had supplied channel 6 with a lifeline, it was still a competitor. In 1967, XEHL mounted the first color transmissions by a Mexican regional television station, already reaching a 100km radius and looking to go further. Meanwhile, Televicentro’s 2 and 4 found a series of mountains were causing signal trouble for their stations. While a site on Cerro de Santa Fe was proposed, the costs of installing a studio-transmitter link were too much, and so the powers of each station were increased to 25 kW with a higher tower.

    Competition was heating up, and in 1967, TSM doubled down, presenting a live program from Guadalajara to Mexico City and Monterrey—via microwave—for the first time. The next year, the government offered concessions for Mexico City’s 8 and 13, allowing TIM to finally reach the nation’s capital. Even more concerning for TSM—and even for Televisión Tapatía—was that TIM was becoming a colossus of its own, backed not just by its own stations but by the incorporation of Tele-Cadena Mexicana transmitters into its network. These structural changes had the government more concerned about ensuring cultural and moral quality of television programming, and not only that, but the government began requesting air time from all broadcasters, 12.5% of it, effective in the 1969 Radio and Television Law which remained on the books for 45 years.

    TIM finally came to Guadalajara in 1971 when XHGA-9 came to air, even before getting all of its legal hurdles cleared. Its test programs began early that year, fed by XHTM-8 Mexico City, and normal programming began on July 30. Coverage was up, more people had TV sets (though the growth was still a bit slow compared to the rest of the country)...but the 1970s and a new president were approaching.

    Echeverría and the Mexico of the 70s

    On December 1, 1970, Luis Echeverría Álvarez, who as interior minister took a hard stance against the media, became the president of Mexico. He did not waste time in getting the government more involved into broadcasting. His creation of the Subsecretariat of Broadcasting came just days into his presidency. In 1971, CEMPAE—the Center for the Study of Advanced Media and Education Processes—was created, seeking to harmonize mass media with education. It was clear: Echeverría was not a fan of the existing television landscape.

    And soon the government was getting into it. April 15, 1972, saw the expropriation of XHDF-13 Mexico City by SOMEX with plans to go national, and that same year saw the beginnings of Televisión Rural de México. A war was on, and TSM and TIM, recognizing the bruising competition they were giving each other and their common enemy, began talking about a merger.

    In Guadalajara, Televisión Cultural de México — essentially a channel that cherry-picked cultural programs from the private media and brought them to underserved areas of the country — launched on a station out of Cerro de Santa Fe. (This is probably XHSFJ-11, and if you look closely you can see the mountain written into the callsign.) Meanwhile, Canal 13 would come to the jaliscienses on XHJAL-13.

    It was also announced at this time that the University of Guadalajara would be getting a television station, but this was probably more of a bluff by the government. The U de G would end up getting that station—nearly forty years later.

    Televisa’s Reign Strengthens

    When Televisa came about from TSM and TIM on January 8, 1973, it shuffled its networks nationwide. XHGA-9, which had been in the TIM network with regional program production, became a repeater of XHGC-5.

    In 1974, Televisión Tapatía cut the cord with TSM, once more resorting to an abundance of live programming to keep it afloat. However, by this time, Televisa was a giant, and the state was also in the business of television, so XEHL found itself fighting for its life. In 1980, channel 6 waved the white flag and sold out to a group run by Radio Programas de México, which already had radio stations and whose owner, Clemente Serna Martínez, was an old friend of the Azcárraga regime. Radio Programas de México folded Canal 6 into its Grupo DK of radio operations, capped by XEDK radio, and on October 23, 1980, XEHL became XEDK-TV. New management brought in new equipment and closer ties to Televisa (particularly sports from Mexico City’s channel 4 and the participation of all its major players).

    Into the 90s and Today

    In 1990, the state government of Jalisco put a new project forward: the building of a state television station in Guadalajara. The project, modeled after the state networks that had begun to spring up nationwide in the 80s (particularly recognized examples being the Veracruz and Michoacán state networks), bore fruit when XHGJG-7 signed on January 16, 1991. Over the course of the decade, “C7” (as it is now known) boosted its signal power several times and eventually came to be a fixture in the television landscape. In 1999, the government received a permit to bring C7 to Ciudad Guzmán, as XHGZG-12, and eventually Puerto Vallarta received a transmitter as well, XHGPV-13.

    The Radiotelevisora de México Norte concession of 1994 gave Televisa its fifth and last Guadalajara station, XHGUE-21, which originally was in the Galavisión network but currently airs Canal 5. Not long after XHGUE was launched, XEDK moved from channel 6 to 5, citing interference from high-powered FM transmitters.

    The OPMA project brought Canal Once to Guadalajara in 2010 on XHOPGA-27 (43.x). Previously Once TV, as it was then known, did not have any transmitters in Guadalajara or Monterrey, major omissions for a network with national aspirations. Of course XHOPGA-TDT also offers residents of the ZMG its full suite of cultural networks.

    And the dreams of the U de G did not go unfulfilled, as after a decade of being a program supplier to the local Televisa stations, the nation’s second-largest public university was allowed to bring Mexico’s last analog television station to air. XHUDG-44 went live on January 31, 2011, complementing its statewide FM radio network and soon going digital as well.

    Based on the work of Francisco de Jesús Aceves González, Universidad de Guadalajara, with material sourced from my own research and from Fernando García in the VUD.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  7. #717
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    Really Guadalajara? Can't you even get a decent "apagón analógico"?

    Monitoring live streams of XHUDG-TV, XHG-TV and XHGJG-TV, the only thing I had from XHGJG-TV was this:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The other stations had a simple countdown only.

  8. #718
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gargadon View Post
    Really Guadalajara? Can't you even get a decent "apagón analógico"?

    Monitoring live streams of XHUDG-TV, XHG-TV and XHGJG-TV, the only thing I had from XHGJG-TV was this:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The other stations had a simple countdown only.
    I watched XHUDG. They had nothing.

    At least C7 said "let's make something in one minute to put up on the station".

    Mexico City better do something better tonight because even León could do better.

    While I'm at it, I found a shadow for Doug — 20 kW XHCCU Playa del Carmen. It's the third shadow I know of in that town. XHBD also has a shadow auth worth looking at.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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  9. #719
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    (Thanks to both of you!)

    I know when we did it in the U.S. six years ago, one concern we had was confusing viewers who were watching in digital or on a MVPD (cable, satellite, IPTV) and not affected by what was going on.

    So the slide says they're on both 25.1 and 25.2 - what's the programming on 25.2? Is it a standard-definition simulcast of 25.1?

    I have the shadow on XHCCU. I'm aware of shadows of XHAQR and XHCCQ, both 53kw+/- at 77m. (of course, when there are two Azteca shadows in a community, the technical facilities are usually very similar if not identical)

    I have a 10kw shadow of XHBD in Aguascalientes - is there another one I don't know about?
    Doug Smith W9WI
    Pleasant View, TN EM66
    http://www.w9wi.com

  10. #720
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    Quote Originally Posted by w9wi View Post
    (Thanks to both of you!)

    I know when we did it in the U.S. six years ago, one concern we had was confusing viewers who were watching in digital or on a MVPD (cable, satellite, IPTV) and not affected by what was going on.

    So the slide says they're on both 25.1 and 25.2 - what's the programming on 25.2? Is it a standard-definition simulcast of 25.1?
    XHGJG should have four subs, actually. All 4 are SD. 25.1 is news ("C7 Noticias") and 25.2 is cultural ("C7 Cultura"). They should also have a 25.3 sub with the state congress and 25.4 for the judicial system, but they don't seem to be running right now for some reason.

    If you go to the C7 site they have live transmission of both 25.1 and 25.2.

    On the shadows, I was just making sure you had those.
    Este programa es público, ajeno a cualquier partido político. Queda prohibido el uso para fines distintos a los establecidos en el programa.

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