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Cable bleed post-analog?

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  • Cable bleed post-analog?

    Hi

    My TV antenna is broken, and I have to use my emergency/trip outdoor TV antenna.

    When it's up, lo and behold, on ch 4 I get local WFOR bleed, and on ch 5 (possibly slightly below 5) what looks like the QVC network.

    I have to assume that the cable co. auto-converts to analog. I thought that this would not be a problem post July 12, but I guess I was wrong again.

    Do cable companies *themselves* have a deadline for going all-DTV? Am I stuck with this, until my regular antenna is fixed? Inquiring minds.

    cd

  • #2
    CATV egress (leakage) is an FCC no-no, but they seldom bare their teeth about it unless another licensee is affected (e.g., the CATV Ch E video at 145.25 MHz inside the 2-m ham band) and complains. We had to "play hardball" in early 1991 with the local CATV (it ended up being the classic "dog chewed cable" adjacent west.) This Sep 1983 egress on Ch 4 (local WOAI-4 off) was due to an illegal cable tap adjacent east. http://www.qsl.net/wa5iyx/images/833311.jpg - the CATV folk came out, found that, and changed the backyard box from a 4-port service to a 3-port.

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    • #3
      You could always call the cable company and tell them. Leakage like that is ruining their signal levels, and im sure they would run new coax in that area and fix the problem.
      DX Radios:
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      • #4
        Funny thing----I don't even have cable. Enough neighbors do, I reckon.

        cd

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cd637299 View Post
          I have to assume that the cable co. auto-converts to analog. I thought that this would not be a problem post July 12, but I guess I was wrong again.

          Do cable companies *themselves* have a deadline for going all-DTV? Am I stuck with this, until my regular antenna is fixed? Inquiring minds.
          A lurker here (only a very occasional/casual DXer over the years, though a confirmed "TV geek," but I enjoy reading about y'all's exploits), but I can answer this for you.

          CATV systems are required to continue providing analog versions of at least their "must carry" (i.e., broadcast) signals until sometime in 2012. (I believe this requirement was included in the legislation that extended the OTA analog shutoff from February to June.) They are free (but not required) to continue providing analog feeds of other (non-broadcast) channels as well if they desire, or even of ALL channels past 2012 if they want to do so.

          Some cable companies are grumbling because they want to kill all their analog channels to free up bandwidth for new digital and interactive services. (CATV distributes their digital signals in a heavily compressed form, so they use far less than 6 mHz per channel.) Others probably figure they have a lot of subscribers that still have analog sets in good working order and don't want to tick them off. ("My TV says it's 'cable-ready' -- whaddaya mean I need a set-top 'box' now??") If it is cost-effective and customer-friendly for them to keep providing at least limited analog service, they will do so.

          My local provider still sends out 60+ channels in analog, and has made no indications of changing that, at least not in the near future. They have, over the last few years, been switching a few things gradually in a piecemeal fashion, perhaps hoping to indirectly encourage customers to switch to all-digital through attrition. They have moved a few of the local services (local government channel and the like) and some non-"must carry" broadcast channels (LPTVs, out of market PBS signals, etc.) to the digital tier. And all the new channels they have introduced (including such things as Fox Sports Net and a local sports channel) have been digital-only. But they still carry all the major broadcast signals and a good chunk of popular cable channels in analog.

          They really had no choice, because their whole marketing campaign on the digital transition assured subscribers that they need do nothing, and their analog sets would continue to work just fine. They never made a distinction in this between broadcast DTV stations and CATV channels, so it would have been bad P.R. to suddenly cut off 2/3 of the analog channels and say "well, we said your TV would still work -- we never said you'd still get ALL your channels..." I figure they will continue their trend of converting a channel here and there (probably the lesser viewed stuff) to digital, and maybe in 2012 when the OTA transition is history and mostly forgotten, then they will move everybody to all-digital, probably marketing it as a wonderful new opportunity (as opposed to an annoying burden) and initially providing free set-top boxes and reduced monthly fees to smooth over this "second digital transition." (Or the "third," depending on when the FCC ultimately sets a "drop dead" conversion date for LPs and translators...)

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