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DX: What's Possible? Primer for new DXers

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  • #16
    One more small suggestion: brief recordings of what each propagation mode sounds like, or a link to Mike-CT's recordings. Some people may need an aural example to cement the knowledge.
    2010 Honda Fit stock radio.
    Grundig G8 ultralight .
    Grundig G3

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    • #17
      http://www.qsl.net/wa5iyx/#audio hardly a brief listing, but the prop mode of each clip is noted (Es, ms, tropo, F2, and even a few aurorae) However, the latest Real Audio Player doesn't display the complete textual info that I added when encoding them from WAV files (lacks the date/time of the original tape). There are too many to convert to mp3 and make all the data part of a very long title for each. (I've a backlog of some 4,000 ra clips with MANY more not even yet done from 45+ years of tapes).

      73, Pat - WA5IYX
      Last edited by pjdyer; 12-12-2013, 04:13 AM. Reason: spelling

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      • #18
        The tropo seems to be common in the Midwest and Gulf coastal area, and along the Atlantic Coast (where the DX is usually confined to south and east of the Appalachians). Seem less common in the Pacific NW area, much less so nearby mountain areas.

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        • #19
          For the most part, tropo events with their slow fade in/out behavior aren't very well-suited to keeping records to make diurnal graphs like is the case for the more-sharply defined Es events. Also, one would have to define some sort of minimum distance for a tropo "event", which would likely be different for each observer. Alternately, a selected rare path (like here to Miami) could be chosen and the diurnal behavior of that documented - but that rarity itself would result in a paucity of data to make a meaningful graph plot from.

          73, Pat - WA5IYX

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          • #20
            E's are rare in California on Radio

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            • #21
              <Here are some very basic *general* laws.

              Es occurs 9am to 9pm. Tropo 9pm to 9am. >

              I have to dispute this. It simply isn't supportable. I have at many times and in many locations observed DX via these modes at almost any time of the day, and I've seen numerous reports from others as well.

              One might be able to say that Es occurs more frequently within the hours noted above, but one could not say the same for tropo events, as I can vividly recall tropo events over the years where the tropo persisted 24/7 for 2 or 3 days.
              Russ Edmunds
              15 mi NW Philadelphia, PA
              WB2BJH -- Grid FN20id

              2 ) SDRPlay RSP1a SDRs, Onkyo T450RDS,
              Yamaha T-80 & Conrad RDS Manager;
              Yamaha T-85 & Conrad RDS Manager;
              all w APS9B @ 15'
              Insignia NSHDRAD2 w/ whip.

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              • #22
                I've DX'ed FM at least somewhat seriously in NJ, EPA, NE ME, Central GA, and SE VA, so I know that there are substantial variations. What Gulf Coast DX'ers experience in
                terms of tropo is quite different from what DX'ers elsewhere experience. But my point was that in something intended to instruct beginners, I think we are better served to
                provide info in simple terms, but not to mislead. Generalizations ( and I forget which famous person once said "All generalizations are false, including this one" ) can be misleading, and I believe that to be true in this case - it's too easy for a beginner to draw erroneous conclusions.
                Russ Edmunds
                15 mi NW Philadelphia, PA
                WB2BJH -- Grid FN20id

                2 ) SDRPlay RSP1a SDRs, Onkyo T450RDS,
                Yamaha T-80 & Conrad RDS Manager;
                Yamaha T-85 & Conrad RDS Manager;
                all w APS9B @ 15'
                Insignia NSHDRAD2 w/ whip.

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                • #23
                  Danny I wouldn't delete any posts, nor would I apologize for any statements made. I believe every member here understood what you meant. Of course there are exceptions to that rule. As far as newbies go...there is a learning curve that goes with any hobby. It wouldn't take a newbie long to realize there isn't really a switch that turns propagation on at 9am then off at 9pm. It's hard to imagine that the omission of one little word "most", could cause such a stir from a member. I think his response to what you said was a little too direct, and could have been worded in a more respectful manner. I think you deserve that much. After all...you sir, have made enormous contributions to the forum, and the hobby.
                  mike
                  TVDXing since 7/27/09

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                  • #24
                    Many thanks, Mike.
                    Danny
                    Shreveport, LA
                    Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
                    Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
                    TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
                    My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
                    More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

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                    • #25
                      One thing to remember is that we're writing in generalizations. There are exceptions to everything said in these posts, of course, but we're making generalizations here. To cover all bases, let's just say that your mileage may vary.
                      Mike B.
                      Enfield, CT
                      -72° 30' W/41° 59' N
                      FN31RX

                      Online since 1999 and still going at
                      mikesdx.com

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                      • #26
                        Reading articles about propagation, watching videos, and listening to audio clips are very useful for DXers.

                        However, my feeling is that all of the talk, articles, videos, and audios in the world won't replace actual DXing experience
                        in understanding the differences in propagation modes.

                        As far as generalizations and exceptions go, a newcomer will understand that Es and tropo events can occur at any time
                        if he/she reads Doug's original post.
                        Danny
                        Shreveport, LA
                        Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
                        Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
                        TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
                        My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
                        More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

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                        • #27
                          In doing a little bit of research, I've come to this conclusion: While 9am to 9pm tropo is not common in
                          some regions, afternoon tropo (especially on FM) is indeed more common in other regions.

                          However, it appears that the number of *daytime* tropo events in one year is not as plentful as the number
                          of *daytime* E-skip events during a one-year period.

                          Nevertheless, my words about 9 - 9 are *not* correct for every region.
                          Last edited by Danny; 12-24-2013, 06:36 PM.
                          Danny
                          Shreveport, LA
                          Mexico/Latin America TV DX ID Tips http://www.tvdxtips.com
                          Submit and read DTV Stats http://www.tvdxexpo.com/dtvdxrecords.html
                          TV and DTV DX Photographs http://www.tvdxexpo.com
                          My Photographs of 100 Mexico TV DX Local IDs http://www.tvdxexpo.com/100mexicotvids.html
                          More than 1,100 TV logs since 1994

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Often during trans-gulf tropo conditions during the day propagation over land will dissipate but continue over water allowing coastal Texas and Mexican FM stations to be received easier. I made this FM Es graph some time ago based on all signals logged from 2005-2009. A lack of targets beyond 1500 miles due to endpoint being in rural Rocky Mountain regions or over water certainly lowers the higher numbers.graph.jpg
                            Randy KW4RZ Goldfield, Nevada DM17

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