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  • Salvadoran TV scene

    Hello!

    Here is in El Salvador a hangry dispute between the SIGET (Regulatory Agency of Electricity and communications) and the owners of VHF TV channels, because a former SIGET's Director exchange the UHF ch 37 (hi hi! yes 37 that reserved for radioastronomy) fx to ch 11. The commercials VHF channels are owned by TCS (2,4,6) and TV Azteca(12), ch 8 is Catholic and 10 of the Government.
    I think they don't want another competitor. Any way, I always thinkd there was not technically possible to run adjacent channels in the same city, but right now ch 11 is on air (with NTSC signal) without problems to ch 10 or 12, even a couple of day ago was inaugurated ch 9 owned by the "Asamblea Legislativa" (the congress) and is running ok. The case of ch 11 is now under Supreme Court consideration, but my point is that apparently there is not any technical obstacle to assign ch 3, 5, 7, and 13 in San Salvador !? maybe some of you will catch in the short future a new ch 3 or 5 from here

    Saludos from San Salvador, El Salvador
    Humberto

  • #2


    The problem with adjacent channels was a problem with old TV sets. They often drifted in frequency. And the filters weren't very good.

    TV sets are much better today. I think that's mostly because cable TV uses all VHF channels 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,... So a modern TV can handle stations on every channel.

    As long as the channel 11 transmitter is near the channel 10 and 12 transmitters (so that the channel 11 signal is about the same strength as the channel 10 and 12 signals) it will work fine.
    Doug Smith W9WI
    Pleasant View, TN EM66
    http://www.w9wi.com

    Comment


    • #3
      This is interesting. I know about cable TV channels running together, but actual TV stations next door to each other (aside from 4/5, 6/7 & 13/14), I did not know it was possible. Maybe in the back of my mind I thought that cable TV systems had their own "filters" where there would be no cramming.

      Back in the 1970s, the old Vane Jones logs showed that Mexico City had a 7, 8 & 9. I think the 8 (XEX-TV) was in Estado de Mexico, possibly too far away to interfere with 7 & 9, but the Jones book had it as in Mexico City. I wonder what the arrangement really was.

      Frankly I had doubts about analog 33 & 35 together in Miami in the 1980s. I know the transmitters were in different locations, but I had always thought that UHF's in the same city had to be 6 channels apart. (I shoulda recorded the original WMLB 35 programming for YouTube---really bizarre stuff---like maybe public domain movies & "indie" rock music videos & such. It sure didn't last long. And, I think it only ran 3 hours a day!)

      cd

      PS Humberto----how is the ATSC DTV moving along there? DTV on adjacent channels is no problem, of course. Maybe the 9 & 11 are in preparation?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by cd637299 View Post
        Back in the 1970s, the old Vane Jones logs showed that Mexico City had a 7, 8 & 9. I think the 8 (XEX-TV) was in Estado de Mexico, possibly too far away to interfere with 7 & 9, but the Jones book had it as in Mexico City. I wonder what the arrangement really was.
        8 was in Mexico City. 7 and 9 were at Altzomoni (and aimed toward Puebla).

        The arrangement was changed in 1985 in order to have a 7 and 9 in Mexico City. This led to one of the messiest callsign and frequency shuffles I've ever seen, in a nation that's exceptionally good at them:

        At Altzomoni, XEX-7 moved to 8 and XEQ-9 moved to 10 as XHTM-10.
        In Mexico City, new station XHIMT-7 signed on while XHTM-8 moved to 9 as XEQ-9. [Note that the XEQ callsign was effectively moved to Mexico City. I think this was a question of prestige; of course XEQ was a big radio station in Mexico City.]

        I think there were also changes for shadow channel relays in Toluca (which has an XEQ-8 now), Cuernavaca, Tlaxcala and Pachuca (all served by shadows of XEX and XEQ; Cuernavaca and Tlaxcala have 7-9, Pachuca has 8-10) based on the reallocation of frequencies. This added up to a lot of change for a lot of people (these cities are considered part of a megalopolis with the DF) at one time. In 1988 XHGEM-7 Toluca became XHGEM-12, from what I'm reading probably from interference to XHIMT-7.

        On top of that XHTEM-12 Puebla was originally licensed for Amecameca, Cerro Tlamacas (this explains the callsign: Cerro Tlamacas, Estado de México). This would have been a similar location, between Mexico City and Puebla. XHTEM now transmits from within the city of Puebla with transmitter located not far from Televisa Puebla (XHP-3 plus all digital stations).

        ——

        I should also mention that in drafting channel packing for DTV, Mexico has (in major cities) tried to keep Azteca and Televisa sorta together. In Mexico City Azteca is 24-25-26 and Televisa is 44-48-49-50. (There are also digital stations on RF 23, 27, 45, and 51**). Chihuahua, Chih. is even crazier: 21-22-23-24-(25)-26 with analog 20 and 28 (20 will probably flash-cut, 28 is a small station that might not make it; XHCHZ-TDT-24 and XHFI-TDT-26 are known but not listed in IFT, and XHAUC-TDT will be on RF 25 when it signs on later this year). 21-23 are Azteca, 24-26 are Televisa. 47 and 48 are allocated for the new networks.

        **Channel 51 Mexico City is a very, very long story to describe. It's a 100 kW digital station owned by MVS and will be a subscription television service of some sort (ATSC A/70 standard). It does not have a broadcast call sign. MVS had a concession to use channel 52 for pay TV services.

        ——

        But this is a thread about El Salvador, and so I went for some articles on the topic. Siget is El Salvador's telecom and electric regulator:

        "Media ask Siget to comply with revocation of Channel 11"

        "Legislature christens Legislative TV for $800,000"

        There also appears to be corruption. When 37 was sold from a university to TVRed it was given channel 11 after just 18 hours.

        ES seems to be like the Dominican Republic. All the odd-numbered channels are allocated in UHF and all the even-numbered channels for VHF (plus 9 and now 11). DR has 37 on the air as well.

        This page also tells us that the callsigns of Channels 2, 4 and 6 are YSWR, YSWUR (wasn't this once YSR?) and YSWA. These stations are one channel for the entire nation, as are most UHF stations (except some, like 23, 25, 63 and what seem to be LPTVs on 69; I suspect some aren't actually on the air but allocations). (You can click the TV channels.)

        As to ATSC there's no mention of digital, and I don't see how they can do it the way they have allocated analog TV channels.
        Follow En Frecuencia on Medium and Twitter @EnFrecuencia, your Mexican broadcasting blog.

        The Reference Section features the HD Radio map, list of Article 90 reserved band clears, and more.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Raymie View Post
          As to ATSC there's no mention of digital, and I don't see how they can do it the way they have allocated analog TV channels.
          This link seems to show reception of an ATSC station in El Salvador. It's unclear to me (and my rather poor Spanish) whether this station is virtual channel 21 & RF 63 or the other way around.
          Doug Smith W9WI
          Pleasant View, TN EM66
          http://www.w9wi.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by w9wi View Post
            This link seems to show reception of an ATSC station in El Salvador. It's unclear to me (and my rather poor Spanish) whether this station is virtual channel 21 & RF 63 or the other way around.
            The station appeared to be analog 21 and RF 63, putting out no PSIP.

            I have a news clip on digital TV in El Salvador. It was from last year and it appeared that they were still trying to choose a standard; they had installed a multi-standard transmitter in San Salvador, and though SIGET had chosen ATSC, they now for whatever reason wanted the president to decide.

            Another article mentions that there's apparently an effort to build 7, 13, 14, 16, 18 and 20.

            I think the RF 63 might be a clear QAM case of some sort... Another thing is that they need to clear 700 MHz. I think really that going with ISDB-T is probably their better bet. The Dominican Republic does their shutoff next year and is ATSC—but their shutoff is going to be an overnight affair with no testing whatsoever (there's probably no room on their TV dial!). Looks like they're getting off VHF entirely!
            Follow En Frecuencia on Medium and Twitter @EnFrecuencia, your Mexican broadcasting blog.

            The Reference Section features the HD Radio map, list of Article 90 reserved band clears, and more.

            Comment


            • #7
              Raymie, in San Salvador, 2 used to be YSR-TV, and 4 was YSU-TV....not sure about ch 6.

              That Mexico City deal....I'm speechless @ the keyboard.

              cd

              Comment


              • #8
                Intersting comments of all, here are some comments from my side:

                - The standard for DTV was adopted as ATSC around 2009, but this was revoked by the SIGET to study other options, mainly the Brazillian-Japanese standar, I think someone in the new administration has commercial interest. Mostly, if not all, of the new TV set on the salvadorean market are ATSC compatible. By now I not sure about the standar adopted but the analog shutdown is claimed to be at 2018.

                - Megavisión ch 21 was testing on ch 63 with ch21 programs on 63.1 dtv (never seen by me)

                - TCS was testing with ch 31 on 31.1 with music and Sony vendors DVD demos with full hd ( I think I did send some pics to Chris D.)

                - I never seen the other test of the goverment, anyway I only can decode ATSC

                - The change of callsign was according a ITU recomendation to standar 4 letter said a SIGET spokesman, ch 6 was before YSLA, but anyway was changed.

                Here are some pics from ch8 to 12 (with logos) from this morning and and a scan of the spectrum from 180 to 210 MHz

                ch8.jpgch9.jpgch10.jpgch11.jpgch12.jpgSin título.png

                Comment


                • #9
                  Amazing---no ghosts! Ch 10 is TVes? El presidente de Venezuela won't like that.

                  Humberto, no I do not recall you sending me the ATSC photos. Could you send me a link to a TV store ad in San Salvador, so I can see the TV sets available there? I assume they are still selling analog, then.

                  cd

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cd637299 View Post
                    Amazing---no ghosts! Ch 10 is TVes? El presidente de Venezuela won't like that.
                    cd
                    ja ja ja ja yes TVes is ch10

                    In big stores only you get Flat panel tv with ATSC / NTSC , CRT type are available on some supermarkets like Wallmart

                    btw: http://www.siman.com/elsalvador/tecnologia.html?cat=4

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