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25.02 MHz to 49.58 MHz

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  • 25.02 MHz to 49.58 MHz

    Anybody here monitor local or DX the FCC low band Ind/Bus & Pub/Svc frequency allocations? If so what's your setup from radio to antenna? I tried it once with an Icom R75 feeding 1/2" hardline to a DIY 1/2 wave dipole, couldn't make it work, only real low band stuff in Florida is FLDOT & they mostly use cellphones even though this quite rare system for Florida was built out like 3 years ago. Maybe Florida's not good for DX, Tropo, Skip, Meteor Scatter or whatever.

  • #2
    It's been a while but... I had the Icom R-7000 connected to a home-brew vertical dipole (appx 8 ft overall length) through RG-11 coaxial cable. The antenna was side-mounted near the top of a 50 ft tower. I used this set-up mostly for monitoring the low-VHF TV channels.

    Though I never kept a log for 30-50 MHz, I did tune through the band during E-skip propagation events. I remember hearing Canadian Park rangers, fuel-oil delivery companies, School Bus drivers, military-sounding traffic, baby monitors / portable phones, Fire / Rescue services, and several un-identified stations speaking English / French / Spanish.

    73, Ed NN2E
    Owner / Operator - Murphy's Law Test Site & Thunderstorm Proving Grounds
    "You Might Be a Redneck If...
    Your TV is on 24/7.
    Your TV has been permanently on for over a decade.
    The only time your TV is off is during a power outage.
    Your TV gets 512 channels, but you go outside to use the bathroom.
    Your new TV is sitting on top of your old TV.
    Your TV costs more than all of your other furniture.
    Your deer-stand has a TV antenna on it.
    Your cable provider has no idea that you exist."
    Jeff Foxworthy

    Comment


    • #3
      Ha ha ha, I like the Redneck ditty, anywho I cut my teeth on low band when I lived on Long Island, first ever radio was a Harran Labs 1.5 MHz spread low band tube radio that picked up Suffolk County FD's, next was the inimitable Radio Shack tunable low bands which I'd listen to the clusters of paging signals around 33 MHz & 43 MHz, then the CB bug bit me & it went on from there. I follow kkn50's Low band logs on RR which proves low band is still alive & kicking in spite of the elevated noise floor but everybody that is convinced in my neck of the woods that low band is doomed & 800 MHz trunked is the second coming has left Florida a virtual low band wasteland. Thanks for your reply & take care.

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      • #4
        I used to live in E-PA & C-NJ before I fled the rat race and moved to KY. I, also, date back to the vacuum tube days. (I still have the 1960 GE b&w set I used to DX with)

        I had one of those tunable Rad-Shack receivers... It was deaf as a post... Propagation had to be really hot before that thing would hear much.

        Funny lo-band story... Back in 'the old days' NJ State Police was on 44 MHz. So was some little Police Department down at Butt Crack, AR. (fictional name but, you get the idea) During E-skip season the two police department radio systems would 'overlap.'

        From AR dispatch...

        "Sheriff Roy!? Thississ Mary-Lou over ta tha dispatch office. Yall gotta run over ta tha widder Jones's place. She's gotta rabid dog all foamin' at tha mouth an runnin round her yard. She's a wonderin' iffun you kin come over an shoot it."

        ... The NJSP officers seemed to enjoy this, because, for the rest of the afternoon, they all talked to each other using their best pseudo-Arkansas accents. :-)

        73, Ed NN2E
        Owner / Operator - Murphy's Law Test Site & Thunderstorm Proving Grounds
        "You Might Be a Redneck If...
        Your TV is on 24/7.
        Your TV has been permanently on for over a decade.
        The only time your TV is off is during a power outage.
        Your TV gets 512 channels, but you go outside to use the bathroom.
        Your new TV is sitting on top of your old TV.
        Your TV costs more than all of your other furniture.
        Your deer-stand has a TV antenna on it.
        Your cable provider has no idea that you exist."
        Jeff Foxworthy

        Comment


        • #5
          25.02 MHz To 49.58 MHz

          There really isn't that much of interest to me in that frequency range, but I did used to like to listen to the Minnesota Army National Guard helicopters on their 41 MHz frequency. They used "new" squelch, which is the military standard of 150.0 hz. I would use 5Z (151.4 hz) and it worked fine. Also, their bandwidth was a bit wider, too. I am not sure if that mode is still in use around here, though.

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